Sustainability Design Standards

Sustainability Guidelines

Since 2008, more than 560,000 square feet of new construction and major renovation projects have been built according to Princeton's aggressive sustainability and energy conservation guidelines.

Key Process Highlights:

Evaluate status of all sustainability goals at Schematic Design (SD), Design Development (DD), and 50% and 85%  Construction Documents (CD) review.

  • Tracking of goals - including non-LCCA items like stormwater and "campus as lab" efforts
  • Envelope, daylight reviews
  • Energy model, commissioning plan
  • LCCA workshop and reviews
  • Benchmark status (LEED or otherwise)

Minimum Sustainability Guidelines:

95% minimum requirement to recycle all demolition and recycling debris for all major building projects and renovations post abatement.

Stormwater improvements:

  • Reduce or minimize impervious cover
  • Reduce or minimize peak rate and volume
  • Provide water quality treatment

These guidelines are defined in the Princeton University Facilities Department Design Standards Manual.

Sustainable Building Guidelines in Practice

When planning a building, there are eight distinct regions that may be studied: energy systems, electrical systems, building envelope, siting/massing strategies, structural systems, mechanical systems, water systems, and interior materials. Learn more about sustainability in major projects

image of new buildingA rendering of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, opening Spring 2015.

Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

The building will include an advanced stormwater management system, green roofs, advanced heating and cooling systems, architectural components to conserve energy, and more. You can discover more information about Andlinger's sustainability features in its project description.

Lakeside Graduate Housing

image of new student housingA rendering of the Lakeside Graduate Housing, set to open Summer 2014.

Sustainable features include the preserved mature trees on the site and the geothermal heating and cooling system. Notably, the University selected this technology after applying its internal "carbon tax," which is used when comparing major building systems that cost more upfront but result in economic and environmental benefits over time. For more information about the Lakeside project, you can read its project description.