GreenSpace Archive

Greenspace Kiosk exhibit
Hacking Sustainability
Fall 2015

Exhibit Description

The current exhibit features the C.H.A.O.S. Lab, which is under the direction of Dr. Forrest Meggers, Assistant Professor, School of Architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment and affiliated faculty in Civil and Environmental Engineering. The acronym “CHAOS” stands for Cooling and Heating for Architecturally Optimized Systems. It not only refers to the flow of energy in heating and cooling, but also the associated entropy generation and how exergy (available energy) analysis can help optimize building systems. The C.H.A.O.S. Lab has joined the Internet of Things revolution, streaming data from buildings and experimental setups to a remote server. Collecting building data is inherently important, since operational system feedback is essential to occupant comfort. 

Among the exhibited items are DHT Sensors that measure air temperature and humidity, a model of a Cool Oculus prototype designed by Dorit Aviv '15, a temperature sensing quiz, information about home energy audits and tips to reduce energy use at school, work and home.

Related Resources

  • CHAS Summer team

    The acronym “CHAOS” stands for Cooling and Heating for Architecturally Optimized Systems. It not only refers to the flow of energy in heating and cooling, but also the associated entropy generation and how exergy (available energy) analysis can help optimize building systems.
    By leveraging the architectural design of surfaces and mass in buildings, we can uncover opportunities for system integration that provide additional flexibility in the spaces created, while also minimizing the chaos generated by the heat transfer processes of building systems.

    Pictured: C.H.A.O.S. Team summer 2014 inside the Thermoheliodome: Jovan Pantelic, Nicholas Hochious, Sean Coffers, Hongshan Guo, Louis Wang, Gideon Aschwanden, Jake Read, Dr. Forrest Meggers, Eric Teitelbaum

  • thermal imaging

    In 2014, Dr. Forrest Meggers was awarded funds through the Office of the Dean for Research's Campus as Lab Innovation Fund. Using the Campus as a Lab, Dr. Forrest Meggers models the air flow in large indoor air spaces and monitors the energy efficiency of Princeton's buildings from the air using things like:

    1) Thermal imaging in Frick Chemistry Lab 2) Temperature measurements using DHT sensors of the 3) Double facade wall on the Architecture Building, for which air flow is visualized using 4) Smoke tests. 

    The numbered images correspond with the numbered list above.

  • sensors inside Frick lab

    The C.H.A.O.S. Lab has joined the Internet of Things revolution, streaming data from buildings and experimental setups to a remote server. Collecting building data is inherently important, since operational system feedback is essential to occupant comfort. Using Spark Core and Arduino microcontrollers, temperature, humidity, and mean radiant temperature data, among other data, is streamed and saved. The simplicity of this plug-and-play system is remarkable, and for a fraction of the cost of similar, less customizable conventional systems. These sensors obtain a more complete picture of occupant comfort factors, including directional mean radiant temperature information, as well as detailed information from building airspaces.

    Pictured: DHT sensor in the School of Architecture

  • cool oculus

    The intention of the Cool Oculus is to cool an outdoor pavilion in hot, dry areas in the Middle East. The funnel shape draws humid air to the bottom allowing for evaporative cooling through the membrane. At night the structure folds down and exposes the concrete beneath it to the cool night sky. This concrete remains relatively cool throughout the day. Therefore in combination with evaporative cooling it provides a more thermally comfortable environment. Prototype designed by Dorit Aviv ‘15, graduate of the Princeton Masters Architecture program

    Pictured: Oculus model and rendering image

  • DHT sensor

    A DHT sensor is a small air temperature and humidity sensor. It can combine the temperature and humidity to find the dew point. These sensors are used in combination with Spark Core and Arduino microcontrollers, which are programmed through an online development platform to read and send the data to the lab’s computers either over a serial monitor or wifi respectively for each device. At the GreenSpace, you can see a DHT sensor sending its data to the C.H.A.O.S. website in real time.

  • quiz tubes

    GreenSpace visitors are asked whether wood or aluminum is cooler to the touch. An infrared thermometer can then be used to measure the temperature of each object and reveal the answer. 

    It turns out that both objects are the same temperature. Humans are bad temperature sensors: we do not sense temperature, we sense heat flux. The high thermal conductivity of the aluminum causes it to draw heat from your hand faster than the wood, making it feel “cold.” Similarly, sitting by a cold surface in winter will make you perceive the room is colder as radiation from surfaces around you also shift your perception of temperature (along with air-movement, humidity, metabolic rate, and clothing level).

  • LED lightbulb

    One way to reduce the energy use in your home is to switch to LED lightbulbs. LEDs use about 75% less energy than incandescent bulbs. Source: Energy.gov

  • programmable thermostat

    A programmable thermostat can cut your energy bills by as much as 10%. Source: energy.gov

  • temperature card

    The "Tiger" Zone Temperature card is currently being piloted by Facilities in offices and dorms across campus. The temperature card shows whether the room's temperature falls within an acceptable range, and the University's goal to reduce direct greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. 

  • sweatshirt

    Dress for your comfort! Think of clothing as a way to warm up or cool down - it can be more effective than changing the room's temperature.

Pages